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… Halifax discusses many facets of compassion, in particular what we often refer to as “Whose need is it?” … ” … one can feel acutely distressed about the suffering of another and engage in behaviors that appear to be helpfulto the suffering person, but if he or she is motivated, consciously or unconsciously by […]

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Frank Ostaseski’s Five Precepts of Service lend a strong foundation to the work of accompaniment … The Fifth Precept: Cultivate Don’t-Know Mind. This describes a mind that’s open and receptive. A mind that’s not limited by agendas, roles and expectations. The great Zen teacher Suzuki Roshi, was fond of saying, “In the beginner’s mind there […]

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Frank Ostaseski’s Five Precepts of Service lend a strong foundation to the work of accompaniment … The Fourth Precept: Find a Place of Rest in the Middle of Things. We often think of rest as something that will come when everything else is complete, like when we go on a holiday or when our work […]

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Frank Ostaseski’s Five Precepts of Service lend a strong foundation to the work of accompaniment … The Third Precept: Don’t Wait. Patience is different than waiting. When we wait, we are full of expectations. When we’re waiting, we miss what this moment has to offer. Worrying or strategizing about what the future holds for us, […]

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Frank Ostaseski’s Five Precepts of Service lend a strong foundation to the work of accompaniment … The Second Precept: Bring Your Whole Self to the Experience In the process of healing others and ourselves we open to both our joy and fear. In the service of this healing we draw on our strength and helplessness, […]

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Frank Ostaseski’s Five Precepts of Service lend a strong foundation to the work of accompaniment … The First Precept: Welcome Everything. Push Away Nothing. In welcoming everything, we don’t have to like what’s arising. It’s actually not our job to approve or disapprove. It’s our task to trust, to listen, and to pay careful attention […]

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… is the most important thing we do as we accompany the seriously ill and dying. We have found Frank Ostaseski’s work helpful, in particular his use of Rachel Naomi Remen’s distinctions on serving, helping and fixing.

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