Art & Literature

Inspired by a Tolstoy novella, Kurosawa produces a masterpiece dealing with a topic which every human grapples with at one time or another, but which we all choose to ignore. Set in the times of the aftermath of the second world war, the movie chronicles the journey of a Japanese civic clerk coming to terms […]

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… John Tavener died this past fall … Plough obituary … NYT obituary … For the last six years of his life, Tavener was crippled and in constant pain. Already suffering from Marfan syndrome, a congenital disease that affected his heart, eyes, and muscles, he suffered a series of heart attacks which he barely survived. […]

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We sicken before we die so that we will be weaned from our body. The milk that nourished us grows thin and sour; turning away from the breast, we begin to be restless for a separate life. Yet this first life, this life on earth, on the body of earth – will there, can there […]

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… and suicide. On watching “It’s a Wonderful Life” last night, I was struck by many things. But maybe most of all by the accuracy of its portrayal of the suicide. As Paul McHugh says in The Mind Has Mountains … “Most suicidally depressed patients are not rational individuals who have weighed the balance sheet […]

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… a new translation, done as the translator himself was dying.

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Following the Patient: The Key to Medical Care

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And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time. A masterpiece can be said to be a work with the capacity to outlast its time and speak to cultures vastly different from its own; to transcend its time and place and inspire […]

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“Mystery is not the absence of meaning. It’s the presence of more meaning than we can comprehend.” Dennis Covington – Image Journal 77

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“ … the point that obsessed Sophocles’ Antigone: that to not bury her brother, to not treat the war criminal like a human being, would ultimately have been to forfeit her own humanity.” Daniel Mendelsohn in The New Yorker “Unburied: Tamerlan Tsarnaev and the lessons of  Greed tragedy”

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… Wieseltier on ‘big data’ … “The mathematization of subjectivity will founder upon the resplendent fact that we are ambiguous beings. We frequently have mixed feelings, and are divided against ourselves. We use different words to communicate similar thoughts, but those words are not synonyms. Though we dream of exactitude and transparency, our meanings are […]

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